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Published on November 10th, 2019 | by Mark Dwyer

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Future Female Pilots Seminar Cork

Worldwide only 3 per cent of pilots are female – raising the odds of a two-woman flight crew to one in 1,000. At AFTA we would like help change these statistics. This one hour seminar is aimed at females from 13 to 65 who are considering a career as a commercial pilot . Senior female instructors and past and present female students will present to you their journey into aviation and impart their advice to any member of the audience considering this as a career. A career as a pilot is like no other and there are many benefits to choosing a career as an airline pilot. If you are interested in finding out more please come along.

This talk will be followed be a presentation by more of the AFTA team who will introduce you to AFTA, and explain to you in detail our Integrated Training Programmes.

We will also be on hand afterwards to answer your questions, book your complimentary tour of our academy, or guide you on your best route to becoming a Commercial Pilot. More details HERE.


About the Author

Mark Dwyer

Mark is an airline pilot flying the Boeing 737 for a major European airline. In addition he is also a Type Rating Instructor, Type Rating Examiner and Base Training Captain on the B737. Outside of commercial flying Mark enjoys flying light aircraft from the smallest 3 Axis microlights up to heavier singles. He is also an instructor and EASA Examiner on single engines and a UK CAA Examiner. He flies the Chipmunk for the Irish Historic Flight Foundation (IHFF). Mark became the Chairman of the National Microlight Association of Ireland (NMAI) in 2013 and has overseen a massive growth in the organisation. In this role he has worked at local and national levels. In 2015, Mark won ‘Upcoming Aviation Professional Award’ at the Aviation Industry Awards sponsored by the IAA. Mark launched this website back in 2002 while always managing the website, he has also been Editor and Deputy Editor of FlyingInIreland Magazine from 2005 to 2015.



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